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Pfalz D.XII
5.90Mb (1 downloads)
Pfalz D.XII The Pfalz D.XII was a good aircraft, but it was not as maneuverable as the Fokker D.VII. Thanks to its sturdy wing and thin airfoil section, the D.XII maintained the excellent high-speed dive characteristics of the earlier Pfalz D.III. Like most scouts of the era, however, the D.XII had an abrupt stall and a pronounced tendency to spin. Contemporary pilots consistently criticized the D.XII for its long takeoff run and "clumsy" handling qualities in the air, but consistently compared it against the Fokker D.VII. Rate of roll, in particular, appears to have been deficient. Landings were difficult because the D.XII tended to float above the ground, and the landing gear was weak. Ground crews disliked the extensive wire bracing that accompanied the two-bay wing, again comparing it to the Fokker D.VII which didn't have them. However, it was an improvement over the Albatros D.V and Pfalz D.III which still equipped a number of Jastas and did provide good service. When it was equipped with comparable engines, the Pfalz D.XII could out climb, out dive and was faster than the Fokker D.VII. Between 750 and 800 D.XII scouts had been completed by the Armistice. Early production aircraft had a squared off fin and rudder which lacked control authority. This was soon replaced in production with the rounded fin and rudder on this model. The model, textures. panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein with texture change outs by Captain Kurt. Sound is from the SG Fokker DVII
Posted Nov 30, 2021 10:20 by Captain Kurt
 
Pfalz D.XII early production
10.33Mb (1 downloads)
Pfalz D.XII early production The Pfalz D.XII was a good aircraft, but it was not as maneuverable as the Fokker D.VII. Thanks to its sturdy wing and thin airfoil section, the D.XII maintained the excellent high-speed dive characteristics of the earlier Pfalz D.III. Like most scouts of the era, however, the D.XII had an abrupt stall and a pronounced tendency to spin. Contemporary pilots consistently criticized the D.XII for its long takeoff run and "clumsy" handling qualities in the air, but consistently compared it against the Fokker D.VII. Rate of roll, in particular, appears to have been deficient. Landings were difficult because the D.XII tended to float above the ground, and the landing gear was weak. Ground crews disliked the extensive wire bracing that accompanied the two-bay wing, again comparing it to the Fokker D.VII which didn't have them. However, it was an improvement over the Albatros D.V and Pfalz D.III which still equipped a number of Jastas and did provide good service. When it was equipped with comparable engines, the Pfalz D.XII could out climb, out dive and was faster than the Fokker D.VII. Between 750 and 800 D.XII scouts had been completed by the Armistice. Early production aircraft had a squared off fin and rudder which lacked enough control authority. It isn't known how many were delivered to front line Jastas with the early configuration as it was was soon replaced in production with a rounded fin and rudder. The model, textures. panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein with texture change outs by Captain Kurt. Sound is from the SG Fokker DVII
Posted Nov 30, 2021 10:19 by Captain Kurt
 
Albatros C.III
3.64Mb (37 downloads)
The Albatros C.III The German Albatros C.III was a highly successful all-purpose two-seat biplane of World War I, used in a wide variety of roles including observation, photo-reconnaissance, light bombing and bomber escort. The C.III was a refined version of the successful Albatros C.I type. It was eventually produced by 6 subcontractor manufacturers as well as Albatros. The first 12 aircraft went to the front in December 1915 and it was gradually withdrawn from frontline service in mid-1917. But production continued for training aircraft. Orders for 2271 aircraft in total were placed with the first 796 ordered for combat units. The remaining 1475 were produced as trainers. Some 26 Albatros C.III were delivered to Bulgaria, including eight trainers and the Polish Air Force operated 15 Albatros C.III in 1918-1920 during Polish-Soviet War. General characteristics • Crew: 2 • Length: 26 ft 1 in (7.95 m) • Wingspan: 38 ft 4 in (11.7 m) • Height: 10 ft 1 in (3.07 m) • Empty weight: 1700 lbs • Gross weight: 2799 lb • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.III 6-cylinder water-cooled in-line piston engine, 160hp (175 hp @ 1400 rpm) Performance • Maximum speed: 156 km/h (97 mph, 85 kn) • Endurance: 3 hours 20 minutes • Service ceiling: 3,350 m (10,990 ft) [16] • Time to altitude: 3,000 m (9,800 ft) in 35 minutes Armament • Guns: 1 × 7.92 mm Parabellum MG14 machine gun in observer's cockpit and 1 × fixed forward-firing 7.92 mm LMG 08/15 in the nose. • Bombs: up to 200 lb (91 kg) of bombs in four vertical tubes in the fuselage or external racks. - The model, textures, panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein with texture change outs by Captain Kurt
Posted Nov 20, 2021 01:25 by Captain Kurt
 
Albatros D.Va
3.32Mb (44 downloads)
The Albatros D.Va The Albatros D.V was developed from the previous D.III design intended to be a lighter fighter with increased performance. However, as soon as it was deployed to frontline Jastas in May 1917, the new type began having catastrophic wing failures. The D.Va was a further development attempting to solve the wing failures. Although externally it appeared similar to the earlier D.V, the Albatros D.Va airframe was beefed up with additional fuselage frames, stronger wing spars and heavier wing ribs. Aileron control cables were moved from the upper wing to the lower wing, an additional wing tip flying wire was added and a supplement “knee” strut was added to the front of the main V wing struts. These last three are the main visual identifiers for the D.Va versus the D.V. Because of the strengthened airframe, the empty weight increased. Speed and maneuverability were degraded but it was still a capable performing fighter. The beefed up construction coupled with some follow on in-the-field modifications finally resolved the wing failures. Large D.Va orders were placed – some 1600 between August and October 1917. It began reaching front line units in October 1917, replacing the earlier D.V’s. The number of Albatros D.Va’s at the front peaked in April 1918 at 928 – 47% of the total German fighter strength. The model, textures. panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein with texture change outs by Captain Kurt, .
Posted Nov 2, 2021 09:53 by Captain Kurt
 
Siemens-Schuckert DIII
3.75Mb (39 downloads)
Description: he Siemens-Schuckert Werks (SSW) D.III was designed as a fast-climbing interceptor and was to make use of the new 11 cylinder Siemens-Halske 160hp counter-rotary engine. This engine featured a propeller, crankcase and cylinders rotating opposite to the crankshaft, allowing a slower propeller speed for the same power and the elimination of torque, among other things. Initial tests of the Sh.III engine in the SSW D.IIb saw a remarkable (for the time) climb of 7000m in 35 minutes, and the decision was made to design a new interceptor around it. Approximately 41 SSW D.IIIs were delivered to frontline units between April and May, 1918. Most aircraft were supplied to Jagdgeschwader II, whose pilots were enthusiastic about the new aircraft's handling and rate of climb. however after 7 to 10 hours the Siemens-Halske engines began having problems with overheating and piston seizures. The airplanes were returned to the factory for upgrading. They were retrofitted with modified engines, cutaway cowlings, shorter wings, new design ailerons and rudder. They were returned to service in late July 1918 along with a further 30 newly manufactured D.IIIs incorporating the design changes. They were issued to home defense Kest Squadrons this time, because their fast climb capability made them ideal to intercept incoming Allied high altitude bombing raids. The model, textures. panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein with texture change outs by Captain Kurt
Posted Oct 10, 2021 01:05 by Captain Kurt
 
Aviatik DI series 138
6.74Mb (54 downloads)
he Aviatik (Berg) D.I was the first indigenous fighter aircraft built in Austro-Hungary. Oberingenieur Julius von Berg (hence the name "Berg"), appointed as head designer at the Aviatik company, designed the first prototype late 1916. Work on the prototype began in August 1916, while the first flight of the Aviatik (Berg) DI prototype, marked 30.14, took place at 16th October 1916 at Aspern, unfortunately killing the test pilot. Further modifications were made, and three more prototypes of the Aviatik D.I were manufactured, labeled 30.19 (for tests on the ground), 30.20 (for tests in flight) and 30.21 (as a reserve airframe). Tests of the modified aircrafts were positive and the first unit to receive the first serial batch of the Aviatik D.I was Fluggeschwader I (FLG I, later to be renamed to Flik 101G) on the Divacca airfield (Italy). In many respects, the D.I was allegedly a good combat aircraft compared to its contemporaries. It was a reasonably fast aircraft, possessing excellent flying characteristics and maneuverability, and could reach higher altitudes than most of its adversaries. Despite those desirable features, the new Aviatik fighter wasn't greeted with enthusiasm when it entered service in autumn 1917, as the type also had some serious defects which didn't endear it to its pilots.The D.I had a roomy and comfortable cockpit but the forward field of vision was so poor that the pilot had to lean out of the cockpit to aim the guns.The early aircraft had structural deficiencies and their machine guns were installed beyond the reach of the pilot. So if they jammed, there was nothing the pilot could do about it. While the original Aviatik D.I design was sound, the Series 115 aircraft license-produced by the Lohner firm at Wien-Floridsdorf were notorious for failures along the wing trailing edges during high speed maneuvers. Lohner had deviated from Aviatik specifications by employing thinner, lighter wing ribs. These problems were later rectified with the strengthening of the airframe and the repositioning of the guns. The engines tended to overheat far too easily. To alleviate the cooling problems, operational units tended to fly their aircraft without the engine's top panels. The Austro-Hungarian aviation units used the D.I widely until the end of the First World War on Eastern, Italian and Balkan fronts, mainly as an escort for reconnaissance aircraft but also as fighters, even though most of the fighter units preferred the Albatros D.III for air superiority. The D.I represented over 40% of fighters in use by the Austro-Hungarian Air Force in the last year of the war. Some 677 units, comprised of 16 different production versions, were delivered by October 1918. The 138 series which this model represents was 43% of the total production. The Aviatik (Berg) DI was manufactured under license by a number of subcontractors. Aviatik built the 38, 138, 238 and 338 series Lohner built the 115 and 315 series LLoyd manufactured the 48, 248 and 348 series. MAG built the 84 and 92 series Thone & Fiala manufactured the 101 and 201 series WKF built the 184, 284 and 384 series. The major differences between the series were the various power of its Austro-Daimler engines, structural modifications, gun modifications and radiator modifications. The model, textures. panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein with texture change outs by Captain Kurt, .
Posted Sep 30, 2021 02:31 by Captain Kurt
 
FW190A-8 Afrika and Europa Update
FW190A-8 Afrika and Europa Update
15.07Mb (85 downloads)
I made the virtual cockpit a lot more viewer friendly. You can see the kills better and make carrier landings easier. Also I learned the A's could carry (2) 300 Liter drop tanks.
Posted Sep 11, 2021 10:59 by Vincent Farnham
 
Bf109F-4'42
Bf109F-4'42
10.41Mb (97 downloads)
Eberhard Von Boremski F-4. 523 KPH @ Sea Level/1.33ata 2500 RPM. 3700 FPM Climb Rate. 295 HP GM-1 Nitrous. DB601E was fully rated July 1942.
Posted Sep 11, 2021 10:39 by Vincent Farnham
 
Macchi M.5
7.58Mb (77 downloads)
Macchi M.5 The Macchi M.5 was an Italian Aviazione per la Regia Mara (Italian Navy Aviation) floatplane fighter. It was one of the best floatplane fighters of WWI with performance matching the best of contemporary land-based fighters. It was operated by five Italian maritime patrol squadrons beginning in the summer of 1917 as a convoy escort and fighter. In 1918 it was also flown by Italy based US Navy and Marines pilots. Macchi delivered 200 and the Societa Aeronautica Italiana built another 44. It continued in Italian service into the mid 1920's. Engine: Issota Fraschini V4B, 160 hp, Wingspan: 39.0ft, Length: 26.5ft, Max Weight: 2182lb (empty:1719), Speed: 117mph, Range: 273mi, Ceiling: 20,300ft m, Armament: 2 × 6.50mm FIAT Rivelli machine guns, Endurance: 3.6hr --- The model, textures. panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein Bastian Hundt, and Horst Weingärtner with texture change outs by Captain Kurt
Posted Sep 5, 2021 09:45 by Captain Kurt
 
CFS2 Armstrong Whitworth F.K.8
3.59Mb (49 downloads)
The Armstrong Whitworth F.K.8 was a World War One British 2 seat reconnaissance / bomber. It was designed by the Dutch designer Frederick Koolhoven working for Armstrong Whitworth. It was ordered for the replacement of the RAF BE.2c and Armstrong Whitworth’s earlier F.K.3. It first flew in 1916 and reached squadron service in France in January 1917. During production it underwent several design changes to cowling, radiators and landing gear. It was popular with its crews, being sturdy and dependable, and it was nicknamed the Big Ack. It had multiple roles; bombing, ground attack, reconnaissance, and artillery spotting. Although some 1700 were produced and despite its popularity with its aircrews, it was overshadowed by the RE.8 and today is one of the lesser known WW1 British two seaters. It was flown by 5 Western Front Squadrons (2, 8, 10 35, and 82) and also served in the Middle East and Home Defense duties in Britain. -- The model, textures, panel, and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. British 25 lb Cooper bombs are from the 'Aerocrate Misc. Uires and more.zip' by Gary Aumaugher http://www.sim-outhouse.com/freeflight/Areo_Misc.zip Gauges are by Martin Klein, and Microsoft. Bomb sight by Gary Aumaugher
Posted Aug 8, 2021 11:31 by Captain Kurt
 
 
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