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Aich D3A2 model 22 Val
3.11Mb (246 downloads)
Aichi D3A2 model 22 Val During the early years of the pacific war, the Val was a highly effective and feared aircraft but this gradually changed as the war progressed. When the US Navy sank the 4 of the most important Japanese aircraft carriers during the battle of Midway, many Vals and their experienced pilots were lost. Based on combat experiences, the designers from Aichi tried to improve the top speed of the D3A1 model 11 by replacing its engine with the much more powerful Kinsei 54 (take-off power: 1300 HP). This modification went into mass-production in August of 1942 as the Aichi D3A2 model 22, and was delivered to units during fall of 1942. By this point however, the new D4Y1 Judy dive bomber was already available and in mass-production. The D4Y became the standard carrier dive-bomber of the Japanese navy. The D3A2 Vals were then stationed on land-based airfields as well as on smaller carriers which the D4Y couldn’t land on because of its higher landing speed. The increase in speed compared to the D3A1 however did not prevent the D3A2 from being nothing but cannon fodder for the new US fighters like the Hellcat and Corsair. Squadrons equipped with D3A2s suffered catastrophic losses and they weren’t able to deal any significant damage to allied naval vessels anymore. At the beginning of 1944 many D3A2s were modified and sent to training units, receiving the designation D3A2-K, but the D3A2 continued in service until the end of the war mainly as a kamikaze aircraft. Production of the D3A2 was completely stopped in June 1944. In total 470 D3A1s, and 1016 D3A2s were produced. The D3A remains one of the most iconic planes ever produced by the Japanese. It sank at least 16 allied warships which makes it one of the most successful dive-bombers of all time. Using the D3A1 by Akemi as a starting reference, the D3A2 model and textures were developed by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures are Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. The 2D panel background image is by Morton, much modified to more closely match the model VC. The gauges are by Microsoft, FDG, JWB and Martin Klein. The Bombs are by Allen. The air files are by Akemi, modified to D3A2 specs. The rear gunner and canopy opening are activated by the retract gear command.
Posted May 22, 2022 14:04 by Captain Kurt
 
Bristol F2b
11.77Mb (134 downloads)
The Bristol F2b fighter Any discussion of World War I air combat usually brings to mind the image of nimble single-seat fighters engaged in dogfights above the trenches, aircraft such as the S.E.5, Sopwith Camel, Nieuport and Spad. At the time however, one of the most formidable fighter planes of the period was a single-engine two-seater, the Bristol F2b, which was generally known as the Bristol Fighter or the "Brisfit". The F.2B was regarded as a great success in its day. It was among the few aircraft to remain in production after hostilities ended and was on active military service long after WWI. The Royal Air Force did not retire the last of its F2b's until 1931, and many Bristol Fighters served in other air arms, including the U.S. Army Air Service. The model, textures, panel, and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Sound is by Gary Jones British 25 lb Cooper bombs are from the 'Aerocrate Misc. Uires and more.zip' by Gary Aumaugher http://www.sim-outhouse.com/freeflight/Areo_Misc.zip Gauges are by Martin Klein, Bastian Hundt, Horst Weingartner and Microsoft.
Posted Mar 23, 2022 18:00 by Captain Kurt
 
Breguet XIV A2
6.51Mb (122 downloads)
Breguet built XIV A2 of French escadrille Br.11, November 1917 The Breguet XIV This aircraft was the outstanding French day bomber/reconnaissance aircraft of World War I. The Breguet XIV A2 reconnaissance version and the Breguet XIV B2 bomber equipped at least 71 French escadrilles on the Western Front by November 1918 and were also used by units in Serbia, Greece, Macedonia and Morocco. The prototype flew for the first time on 21 November 1916. Following successful deployment by the French, the type was also ordered by the Belgian Army (40 aircraft) and the United States Army Air Service (over 600 aircraft). Around half the Belgian and US aircraft were fitted with Fiat A.12 engines due to shortages of the original Renault 12F. By the end of World War I, some 5,500 Breguet 14s had been produced. and some 8,000 of the type were built up to 1926. Production was spread over eight manufacturers; Breguet, Michelin, Renault, Farmen, Darracq, Bellanger, Schmitt, and SIDAM. The model, textures. panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein, and Microsoft
Posted Jan 15, 2022 01:55 by Captain Kurt
 
Breguet XIV B2
6.80Mb (89 downloads)
Michelin built Breguet XIV B2 of USAS 96th Aero Squadron The Breguet XIV This aircraft was the outstanding French day bomber/reconnaissance aircraft of World War I. The Breguet XIV A2 reconnaissance version and the Breguet XIV B2 bomber equipped at least 71 French escadrilles on the Western Front by November 1918 and were also used by units in Serbia, Greece, Macedonia and Morocco. The prototype flew for the first time on 21 November 1916. Following successful deployment by the French, the type was also ordered by the Belgian Army (40 aircraft) and the United States Army Air Service (over 600 aircraft). Around half the Belgian and US aircraft were fitted with Fiat A.12 engines due to shortages of the original Renault 12F. By the end of World War I, some 5,500 Breguet 14s had been produced. and some 8,000 of the type were built up to 1926. Production was spread over eight manufacturers; Breguet, Michelin, Renault, Farmen, Darracq, Bellanger, Schmitt, and SIDAM. The A2 reconnaissance version was followed into production by the B2 bomber version in the summer of 1917, the latter differing in having Breguet-designed automatic full span flaps on the lower wings, lower wing mounted bomb racks, and transparent panels in the sides of the observer's cockpit. The model, textures, bomb, panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein, and Microsoft
Posted Jan 15, 2022 01:51 by Captain Kurt
 
Morane Saulnier Roland Garros
15.17Mb (99 downloads)
Roland Garros’ Morane Saulnier Type L Although not well known, the two seat Morane Saulnier Type L parasol played a large role in WWI aviation between 1914 and 1916. Some 600 were produced by France and used it extensively in the unglamorous reconnaissance role. But it was also the first operational tractor airplane to be armed with a fixed machine gun firing through the propeller arc. The design dated from August 1913 and first 50 Type L parasols were ordered by Turkey rather than by the France. The Aviation Militaire permitted this but required these were to be powered only by a Gnome 50hp engine as all 80hp engines were reserved for French aircraft. They had prototype’s wing span of 33ft, 5 1/2in. When full production was begun, the Type L had a wingspan of 36ft, 9in, wing cutouts to accommodate the observer in the rear seat, a lengthened nose section and other differences. With war imminent and mobilization ordered, the Turkish Moranes were impressed, apparently re-engined with the 80 hp LeRohone 9c, and used to equip two reconnaissance Escadrilles, MS23 and MS26. One of the MS26 pilots was Roland Garros, who was a prewar celebrity air race pilot. The story goes that Garros secured a machine gun and enlisted designer Raymond Saulnier and his personal mechanic Jules Hue to figure a way to enable it to fire forward through the Type L’s propeller arc. Saulnier had been experimenting with a synchronizing interrupter gear, but it was proving erratic. So between Saulnier and Hue they designed a bullet deflector wedge fitted to the propeller which would prevent a bullet from piercing the prop. From photographs it is apparent that Garros was able to equip one of the MS26 impressed Turkish Type L aircraft with the deflector propeller and a Hotchkiss machine gun. This he used to shoot down his first German aircraft on April 1, 1915. He shot down two more on April 15 and April 18. But on April 18 he was also brought down behind German lines by engine trouble. He was able to land uninjured but was captured and the secret of being able to fire directly through the propeller arc was in German hands. The model, textures. panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein. Sounds are from the Nieuport 17 by Gary Aumaugher
Posted Dec 7, 2021 20:53 by Captain Kurt
 
Morane Saulnier Type L
7.65Mb (89 downloads)
The Morane Saulnier Type L Although not well known, the two seat Morane Saulnier Type L parasol played a large role in WWI aviation between 1914 and 1916. Some 600 were produced by France for the unglamorous reconnaissance role. But it was also the first operational tractor airplane to be armed with a fixed machine gun firing through the propeller arc and the first aircraft used to destroy a German Zeppelin in flight. The design dated from August 1913 and first 50 Type L parasols were ordered by Turkey rather than by the France. The Aviation Militaire permitted this but required these were to be powered only by a Gnome 50hp engine as all 80hp engines were reserved for French aircraft. They had the prototype’s wing span of 33ft, 5 1/2in. With war imminent and mobilization ordered, the Turkish Moranes were impressed, apparently re- engined with the 80 hp LeRhone 9c, and used to equip two reconnaissance Escadrilles, MS23 and MS26. At the same time, full production was begun for the Aviation Militaire. With full production, the Type L had an increased wingspan of 36ft, 9in, and wing cutouts to accommodate the observer in the rear seat. Soon design improvements included a lengthened nose section and repositioned landing gear legs among other minor variations. The Aviation Militaire used the Type L extensively throughout 1914, 1915 and early 1916. In 1914, the British RFC in France accepted 52 Type L Parasols for No.3 Squadron with a few going to No.1 and No,12 Squadrons. Also an order of 25 was placed by the RNAS for No.3 wing at Mudros, Lemnos, Greece and No.1 Wing at Dunkerque. Flying from Dunkerque, on June 7, 1915, Flt Sub Lieutenant R. A. J. Warneford destroyed Zeppelin LZ37, the first in mid air, by bombing it with six 20Lb Hales bombs. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his success. Under licenses obtained just prior to hostilities, Pfalz Flugzeugwerks GmbH produced some 60 virtually identical aircraft, powered by Oberursel engines as the Pfalz A.I, A.II and E.III types (carrying a Spandau MG with an interrupter gear). These were flown by the Bavarian flying units up to mid 1916. Also under license, the Russian companies Duks and Lebed manufactured approximately 450 Type L Parasols for the Czar’s Imperial Russian Air Force.
Posted Dec 7, 2021 20:53 by Captain Kurt
 
Pfalz D.XII
5.90Mb (86 downloads)
Pfalz D.XII The Pfalz D.XII was a good aircraft, but it was not as maneuverable as the Fokker D.VII. Thanks to its sturdy wing and thin airfoil section, the D.XII maintained the excellent high-speed dive characteristics of the earlier Pfalz D.III. Like most scouts of the era, however, the D.XII had an abrupt stall and a pronounced tendency to spin. Contemporary pilots consistently criticized the D.XII for its long takeoff run and "clumsy" handling qualities in the air, but consistently compared it against the Fokker D.VII. Rate of roll, in particular, appears to have been deficient. Landings were difficult because the D.XII tended to float above the ground, and the landing gear was weak. Ground crews disliked the extensive wire bracing that accompanied the two-bay wing, again comparing it to the Fokker D.VII which didn't have them. However, it was an improvement over the Albatros D.V and Pfalz D.III which still equipped a number of Jastas and did provide good service. When it was equipped with comparable engines, the Pfalz D.XII could out climb, out dive and was faster than the Fokker D.VII. Between 750 and 800 D.XII scouts had been completed by the Armistice. Early production aircraft had a squared off fin and rudder which lacked control authority. This was soon replaced in production with the rounded fin and rudder on this model. The model, textures. panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein with texture change outs by Captain Kurt. Sound is from the SG Fokker DVII
Posted Nov 30, 2021 10:20 by Captain Kurt
 
Pfalz D.XII early production
10.33Mb (62 downloads)
Pfalz D.XII early production The Pfalz D.XII was a good aircraft, but it was not as maneuverable as the Fokker D.VII. Thanks to its sturdy wing and thin airfoil section, the D.XII maintained the excellent high-speed dive characteristics of the earlier Pfalz D.III. Like most scouts of the era, however, the D.XII had an abrupt stall and a pronounced tendency to spin. Contemporary pilots consistently criticized the D.XII for its long takeoff run and "clumsy" handling qualities in the air, but consistently compared it against the Fokker D.VII. Rate of roll, in particular, appears to have been deficient. Landings were difficult because the D.XII tended to float above the ground, and the landing gear was weak. Ground crews disliked the extensive wire bracing that accompanied the two-bay wing, again comparing it to the Fokker D.VII which didn't have them. However, it was an improvement over the Albatros D.V and Pfalz D.III which still equipped a number of Jastas and did provide good service. When it was equipped with comparable engines, the Pfalz D.XII could out climb, out dive and was faster than the Fokker D.VII. Between 750 and 800 D.XII scouts had been completed by the Armistice. Early production aircraft had a squared off fin and rudder which lacked enough control authority. It isn't known how many were delivered to front line Jastas with the early configuration as it was was soon replaced in production with a rounded fin and rudder. The model, textures. panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein with texture change outs by Captain Kurt. Sound is from the SG Fokker DVII
Posted Nov 30, 2021 10:19 by Captain Kurt
 
Albatros C.III
3.64Mb (128 downloads)
The Albatros C.III The German Albatros C.III was a highly successful all-purpose two-seat biplane of World War I, used in a wide variety of roles including observation, photo-reconnaissance, light bombing and bomber escort. The C.III was a refined version of the successful Albatros C.I type. It was eventually produced by 6 subcontractor manufacturers as well as Albatros. The first 12 aircraft went to the front in December 1915 and it was gradually withdrawn from frontline service in mid-1917. But production continued for training aircraft. Orders for 2271 aircraft in total were placed with the first 796 ordered for combat units. The remaining 1475 were produced as trainers. Some 26 Albatros C.III were delivered to Bulgaria, including eight trainers and the Polish Air Force operated 15 Albatros C.III in 1918-1920 during Polish-Soviet War. General characteristics • Crew: 2 • Length: 26 ft 1 in (7.95 m) • Wingspan: 38 ft 4 in (11.7 m) • Height: 10 ft 1 in (3.07 m) • Empty weight: 1700 lbs • Gross weight: 2799 lb • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.III 6-cylinder water-cooled in-line piston engine, 160hp (175 hp @ 1400 rpm) Performance • Maximum speed: 156 km/h (97 mph, 85 kn) • Endurance: 3 hours 20 minutes • Service ceiling: 3,350 m (10,990 ft) [16] • Time to altitude: 3,000 m (9,800 ft) in 35 minutes Armament • Guns: 1 × 7.92 mm Parabellum MG14 machine gun in observer's cockpit and 1 × fixed forward-firing 7.92 mm LMG 08/15 in the nose. • Bombs: up to 200 lb (91 kg) of bombs in four vertical tubes in the fuselage or external racks. - The model, textures, panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein with texture change outs by Captain Kurt
Posted Nov 20, 2021 01:25 by Captain Kurt
 
Albatros D.Va
3.32Mb (118 downloads)
The Albatros D.Va The Albatros D.V was developed from the previous D.III design intended to be a lighter fighter with increased performance. However, as soon as it was deployed to frontline Jastas in May 1917, the new type began having catastrophic wing failures. The D.Va was a further development attempting to solve the wing failures. Although externally it appeared similar to the earlier D.V, the Albatros D.Va airframe was beefed up with additional fuselage frames, stronger wing spars and heavier wing ribs. Aileron control cables were moved from the upper wing to the lower wing, an additional wing tip flying wire was added and a supplement “knee” strut was added to the front of the main V wing struts. These last three are the main visual identifiers for the D.Va versus the D.V. Because of the strengthened airframe, the empty weight increased. Speed and maneuverability were degraded but it was still a capable performing fighter. The beefed up construction coupled with some follow on in-the-field modifications finally resolved the wing failures. Large D.Va orders were placed – some 1600 between August and October 1917. It began reaching front line units in October 1917, replacing the earlier D.V’s. The number of Albatros D.Va’s at the front peaked in April 1918 at 928 – 47% of the total German fighter strength. The model, textures. panel and air files are by Captain Kurt. The pilot figures were developed from Wolfi's freeware Japanese pilot .fsc source file. The prop spinning texture is by Kelticheart. Gauges are by Martin Klein with texture change outs by Captain Kurt, .
Posted Nov 2, 2021 09:53 by Captain Kurt
 
 
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